Preparing for your birth

 

Do I need to preregister at the hospital?

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There is no need to preregister, your physician or midwife will send your antenatal/pregnancy records to the hospital.

What are my room/accommodation options for my hospital stay?

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At Osler, we want to make your stay with us as comfortable as possible. For your convenience, we are pleased to offer you a choice in accommodations so that you can select the type of hospital room you feel will best support your recovery and overall patient experience.

After your labour and delivery, you and baby will be transferred to Postpartum care to give your family the chance to get to know your baby with the support of our caring and helpful health care team.

You have the option of staying in one of three different room types: Private (1 bed), Semi Private (2 beds), or Standard (3-4 beds), depending on availability. Click here for more details about our room/accommodation options.

It’s always good to know what room/accommodation costs your provincial health insurance and/or third party insurance plans will cover prior to your hospital stay. Many third party health insurance plans will cover the costs or a portion of the costs for a private or semi-private room.

Check with your insurance company before you come to hospital to see if you have coverage for a semi-private or private room so that you can make an informed decision about your preferred room choice when you are admitted to hospital. We cannot contact third party insurance companies on your behalf to inquire about your coverage.

Regardless of which type of room you choose, you will receive the same excellent care from Osler’s team of health care professionals.

Checklist for preparing for birth

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  • Pack hospital bag by 35 weeks gestation (see “Preparing for Your Birth” section)
  • Take Gift of Motherhood online prenatal program (see “Preparing for Your Birth” section)
  • Print off and complete antepartum form and bring to hospital when you go into labour (see “Printable Resources” section)
  • Watch hospital video tour (scroll to bottom of “Preparing for Your Birth” section)
  • Bring your OHIP card and any necessary insurance documents. It’s always good to know what room/accommodation costs your provincial health insurance and/or third party insurance plans will cover prior to your hospital stay. Many third party health insurance plans will cover the costs or a portion of the costs for a private or semi-private room.
  • Ensure you have a family doctor or paediatrician for your baby. Your baby needs an appointment 24 to 48 hours after hospital discharge. If you are a midwife client, your midwife will provide follow up.
  • Read the Maternal Newborn Services booklet
  • Please note this checklist is recommended, but not required before delivery. 
    You may find more information at www.williamoslerhs.ca/havingyourbaby or ask your doctor/midwife
  • Download and print the preparation for birth checklist

How do I take prenatal classes?

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Click here for Etobicoke General Hospital and here for Brampton Civic Hospital.William Osler Health System, in collaboration with Peel Public Health, is offering a free, online prenatal program. The program will help you feel prepared for childbirth and your role as a new parent. Whether or not this is your first pregnancy, we encourage you to access the program. Access the program as soon as possible, to get all the benefits.

In-person classes are offered at Etobicoke General Hospital and Peel Memorial Centre for Integrated Health and Wellness. A four-week session at Etobicoke General Hospital runs Wednesdays from 7 to 9:15 p.m. and at Peel Memorial Centre runs Tuesdays from 7 to 9:15 p.m. The cost of the classes are $195, to register at Etobicoke General Hospital please call 905-494-6763 at Peel Memorial Centre please call 905-494-2120 ext. 58031.

What should I pack in our hospital bag for myself and my partner?

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For mom:
  • Sanitary pads and few pairs of underwear
  • Nursing bra
  • House coat, slippers, socks, and pajamas
  • Personal toiletries
  • Lip balm, lip gloss
  • Snacks and drinks for mom and support person
  • Clothes to wear home
  • Watch and pen
Optional:
  • Breastfeeding pillow
  • A pillow with coloured pillowcase (not white)
  • Camera and extra batteries
  • Music (e.g. Ipod)
  • The hospital will supply you with minimal sanitary pads and diapers. Please go to the hospital pharmacy if you run out of supplies during your stay. 

    Please note the hospital is not responsible for lost items.

What should I pack in our hospital bag for my baby?

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For baby:
  • A pack of diapers
  • Wipes
  • Several swaddling blankets
  • Onesies
  • Going home outfit (onesies, shirt, hat, pants,)
  • Car seat
The hospital will supply you with minimal sanitary pads and diapers. Please go to the hospital pharmacy if you run out of supplies during your stay. 

Please note the hospital is not responsible for lost items.

How do I get to the hospital?

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For directions to all of our hospital sites, please visit our page about getting to the hospital.

How do I get to the unit?

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Etobicoke General Hospital
Go to the central registration desk at the front of the hospital. You will need to bring your OHIP card as well as your William Osler Health System hospital card, if you have one. It is also advisable to bring any extended insurance benefits cards with you.

If you are in active labour go directly to the Labour and Delivery unit located on the 4th level. The front entrance of the hospital is closed after 9pm. To get to the Labour and Delivery unit, enter through the Emergency Department, go to the elevators near the main lobby and exit on the 4th level. The unit is locked and you will have to press the buzzer to gain entrance.

Brampton Civic Hospital
Using the Snow Elevators near the Emergency entrance, please go to the Labour and delivery registration desk located on the 3rd floor. You will need to bring your OHIP card as well as your William Osler Health System hospital card, if you have one. It is also advisable to bring any extended insurance benefits cards with you.

Where should I register when I get to the unit?

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Etobicoke General Hospital
Go to the central registration desk at the front of the hospital, there is no registration on the unit

Brampton Civic Hospital
The registration desk is at the entrance to the Labour and Delivery unit on the 3rd level.

Is there any paperwork I need to complete for my admission?

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Please complete the antepartum assessment.

What if I don't have OHIP coverage?

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Osler does not generally provide elective (non-emergency) inpatient or outpatient health care for uninsured patients - patients who do not have a Canadian health care plan or insurance like Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP).

Our Access to Treatment for Uninsured Patients Policy and Procedure indicates that Osler must first approve any elective care, treatment, procedure for both inpatient and outpatient uninsured patients (including diagnostic imaging and lab work), as well as admission to an inpatient bed. If approved, payment in advance for health care treatment and services at Osler is required.

The ability for an uninsured patient to pay for treatment does not guarantee treatment or any priority.

What do I need to know about induction of labour?

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Induction of labour is the deliberate start of uterine contractions. Some women do not experience a spontaneous or natural beginning to labour. If this happens to you, your doctor or midwife will discuss reasons for induction and also the method that may be used to start your labour.

Inductions are usually booked in advance. Your doctor or midwife will inform you of the date you are booked. The nurse will call you on your booked day and give you a time when you are to come to the hospital. On arrival at the hospital you will proceed to the labour and delivery unit for your induction.
  • Prostin or “Gel”- A doctor inserts the medication into your vagina. It is used to help soften and prepare your cervix for the start of your labour. You will be called in, as a bed becomes available, to have this procedure done. You will be put on a monitor to record the baby’s heart rate for a period of approximately 1-2 hours. You may then be discharged to return to the hospital for a second insertion of gel if your labour does not begin on your first visit.
  • Cervidil - Contains a medication to softens the cervix and may start labour. It is placed in the vagina and is attached to a string, similar to a tampon. It remains in the vagina for up to 12 hours OR until labour starts. You will be put on a monitor to record the baby’s heart rate for a period of approximately 1-2 hours; you may be required to stay in the hospital.
  • Oxytocin- also known as Pitocin. This medication is given intravenously to start or enhance labour. You will be admitted to the birthing until where you and your baby will be monitored. This medication is adjusted at regular intervals, so your contractions occur regularly until your baby is born.
  • Foley (balloon) induction- A catheter (tube) will be inserted into your cervix to help open your cervix. The Foley catheter may be left in your cervix for several hours or even overnight. It may fall out on its own, or be removed during the process of labour induction. Foley balloon catheter has been shown to help start labour.

How can I prepare for a Vaginal Birth after C-section (VBAC)?

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After a c-section, some women choose to give birth vaginally for their next baby. For most women this is a safe option. Some benefits include experiencing a natural childbirth, quicker recovery time, shorter hospital stay, and avoiding abdominal surgery and the associated risks.

William Osler Health System offers a VBAC class once a month to discuss risks and benefits with expecting parents. If your obstetrician or midwife recommends this please call 416-494-2120 x58031 to book your appointment.

Why VBAC?
Vaginal Birth After Caesarean Section (VBAC) is a safe choice for many women who have had a caesarean birth. If you have a healthy pregnancy, have a low horizontal scar on the uterus and go into labour on your own, you have about a 75 per cent chance that you will have a safe, successful vaginal birth.

There are things about your previous birth experience, such as why you had a caesarean section and how many caesareans you have had that will make it more or less likely you will be able to give birth vaginally.

VBAC and repeat caesarean birth are both associated with different risks. Speak with your physician or midwife about which option is best for you and your baby.

The benefits of a VBAC
For you:
Avoids major abdominal surgery and another scar on your uterus
Shorter hospital stay
Faster recovery
Lower risk of infection
More positive birth experience as reported by many women who have had a VBAC.

For baby:
Smoother transition to life outside of the womb.
Have early skin-to-skin contact
Begin breastfeeding sooner

What are my chances of having a VBAC?
The chance you will have a VBAC may be higher if:
You have had a vaginal birth before
Your previous caesarean birth was for breach presentation, twins or problems with the placenta
Your labour progresses well

The chance you will have a VBAC may be lower if:
You go past your expected date of birth
Your labour does not start on its own and you need to be induced
You are significantly overweight
You have had more than one caesarean birth.

How do I prepare for my scheduled C-section?

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If your surgery is elective or pre-booked, you will be given an appointment to come to the hospital the day before and see a nurse in the clinic to have a blood sample taken. Pre-operative (before surgery) and postoperative (after surgery) teaching is done at this time as well.

It is very important that you arrive 2 hours before your scheduled C-Section time. For example, if your surgery is at 8am, you must arrive at 6am. You must not eat or drink anything after midnight. However, if your surgery is scheduled for 4pm you may have a light breakfast before 8am (toast, cereal) and clear fluids until 11am. Showering is required the evening before and morning of surgery.

The use of a Chlorhexidine sponge is highly recommended and available for purchase at the hospital pharmacy, located at Rexall at Brampton Civic Hospital and the pharmacy in the Medical Office Building at Etobicoke General Hospital.

For full information please download the C-section booklet.

Where I can I take a breastfeeding class?

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If you live in Peel Region, visit www.breastfeedinginpeel.ca for more information. If you live in the City of Toronto, visit www.toronto.ca/health/breastfeeding

How do I register for Public Cord Blood Banking?

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There are 5 easy steps to donate your baby’s cord blood donation
  1. Talk to your doctor, nurse or midwife
  2. Download your registration kit or obtain it from your health care provider.
  3. Give signed consent form to your doctor/midwife at your next visit or bring with you on day of delivery
  4. Remember to inform hospital staff of your wish to donate
  5. The cord blood will be collected at Brampton Civic Hospital by a qualified professional
Free interpreter and translation services are offered in Punjabi and Chinese for mothers whose first language is not English. Contact cordblood@blood.ca to request this service. Please provide 6-8 weeks’ notice to ensure all required forms are complete and received prior to your delivery date.

What are my options for cord blood banking or donation?

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Please visit http://parentsguidecordblood.org/en for the full range of choices available for families.

Click on this link to find out more https://www.blood.ca/en/cordblood and how to donate https://www.blood.ca/en/cord-blood/how-do-i-donate

Take a tour of the unit at Brampton Civic

Take a tour of the unit at Etobicoke General

If you are in labour, please go directly to Labour and Delivery.


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